San Jacinto Day

//San Jacinto Day

It was 4:30 p.m. when scout Deaf Smith announced the burn­ing of Vince’s Bridge, the only avenue of retreat for the oppos­ing army. The main Tex­an bat­tle line moved for­ward with their approach screened by the trees and ris­ing ground. Gen­er­al Sam Hous­ton per­son­al­ly led the infantry. In the cen­ter, two small brass, smooth­bore artillery pieces (donat­ed by cit­i­zens of Cincin­nati, Ohio) known as the “Twin Sis­ters” were wheeled for­ward, sup­port­ed by four com­pa­nies of infantry.

The Tex­an army moved quick­ly and silent­ly across the high-grass plain, and then, when they were only a few dozen yards away, charged San­ta Anna’s camp shout­ing “Remem­ber the Alamo!”  The Tex­ans achieved com­plete sur­prise. It was a bold attack in broad day­light.  San­ta Anna’s army, con­sist­ing pri­mar­i­ly of pro­fes­sion­al sol­diers, quick­ly col­lapsed. Hun­dreds of the demor­al­ized and con­fused Mex­i­can sol­diers were rout­ed. The Tex­an army had won a stun­ning vic­to­ry.

The Bat­tle of San Jac­in­to, fought on April 21, 1836, in present-day Har­ris Coun­ty, Texas, was the deci­sive bat­tle of the Texas Rev­o­lu­tion. San­ta Anna, the Pres­i­dent of Mex­i­co, was cap­tured the fol­low­ing day and held as a pris­on­er of war. Three weeks lat­er, he signed the peace treaty that dic­tat­ed that the Mex­i­can army leave the region, paving the way for the Repub­lic of Texas to become an inde­pen­dent coun­try.
Mea­sured by its results, San Jac­in­to was one of the deci­sive bat­tles of the world. The free­dom of Texas  from Mex­i­co won here led to annex­a­tion and to the Mex­i­can-Amer­i­can War, result­ing in the acqui­si­tion by the Unit­ed States of the states of Texas, New Mex­i­co, Ari­zona, Neva­da, Cal­i­for­nia, Utah and parts of Col­orado, Wyoming, Kansas and Okla­homa. Almost one-third of the present area of the Amer­i­can Nation, near­ly a mil­lion square miles of ter­ri­to­ry, changed sov­er­eign­ty.

Chap­man Wealth Man­age­ment takes pride in cel­e­brat­ing San Jac­in­to Day. Don’t Mess With Texas!

2017-09-01T13:21:19+00:00