Holiday

/Holiday
13 05, 2015

Memorial Day

2015-05-13T10:48:34+00:00

It was 1866 and the Unit­ed States was recov­er­ing from the long and bloody Civ­il War between the North and the South. Sur­viv­ing sol­diers came home, some with miss­ing limbs, and all with sto­ries to tell. Hen­ry Welles, a drug­store own­er in Water­loo, New York, heard the sto­ries and had an idea. He sug­gest­ed that all the shops in town close for one day to hon­or the sol­diers who were killed in the Civ­il War and were buried in the Water­loo ceme­tery. On the morn­ing of May 5, the towns­peo­ple placed flow­ers, wreaths and cross­es on the graves of the North­ern sol­diers in the ceme­tery. At about the same time, Retired Major Gen­er­al Jonathan A. Logan planned anoth­er cer­e­mo­ny, this time for the sol­diers who sur­vived the war. He led the vet­er­ans through town to the ceme­tery to dec­o­rate their com­rades’ graves with flags. It was not a hap­py cel­e­bra­tion, but a memo­r­i­al. The towns­peo­ple called it Dec­o­ra­tion Day.

In 1868 the north­ern states com­mem­o­rat­ed the day on May 30. The south­ern states com­mem­o­rat­ed their war dead on dif­fer­ent days. Chil­dren read poems and sang civ­il war songs and vet­er­ans came to school wear­ing their medals and uni­forms to tell stu­dents about the Civ­il War. Then the vet­er­ans marched through their home towns fol­lowed by the towns­peo­ple to the ceme­tery. They dec­o­rat­ed graves and took pho­tographs of sol­diers next to Amer­i­can flags. Rifles were shot in the air as a salute to the north­ern sol­diers who had giv­en their lives to keep the Unit­ed States togeth­er.

In 1882, the name was changed to Memo­r­i­al Day and sol­diers who had died in pre­vi­ous wars were hon­ored as well. In the north­ern Unit­ed States, it was des­ig­nat­ed a pub­lic hol­i­day. In 1971, along with oth­er hol­i­days, Pres­i­dent Richard Nixon declared Memo­r­i­al Day a fed­er­al hol­i­day on the last Mon­day in May.

Chap­man Wealth Man­age­ment salutes those who have died in the ser­vice of our coun­try, those cur­rent­ly serv­ing, and the fam­i­lies who have made great sac­ri­fices for our free­dom. We con­tin­ue to live in the great­est coun­try in the world. On this Memo­r­i­al Day, take a few min­utes to con­sid­er the bless­ings you have, cel­e­brate the rela­tion­ships in your life, both fam­i­ly and friends, and thank a vet­er­an.
Then, on Tues­day, call us to begin work on your future suc­cess! God Bless Amer­i­ca!

Memorial Day 2015-05-13T10:48:34+00:00
15 08, 2011

August 15th: A Very Important Anniversary

2011-09-30T11:21:30+00:00

In July 1944, with World War II rag­ing on, 730 del­e­gates from all 44 allied nations gath­ered at the Mount Wash­ing­ton Hotel in Bret­ton Woods, New Hamp­shire for the Unit­ed Nations Mon­e­tary and Finan­cial Con­fer­ence. Their pri­ma­ry goal was to rebuild the inter­na­tion­al eco­nom­ic sys­tem through a series of rules, insti­tu­tions, and pro­ce­dures. The del­e­gates spent three weeks delib­er­at­ing upon and even­tu­al­ly sign­ing the Bret­ton Woods Agree­ments.

The Bret­ton Woods sys­tem called for each coun­try to adopt a mon­e­tary pol­i­cy that main­tained the exchange rate by tying its cur­ren­cy to the U.S. dol­lar. If you were a favored bank you could exchange your dol­lars for gold at a fixed rate. This anchored the mon­e­tary sys­tem.

On August 15, 1971(“The Anniver­sary”), the Unit­ed States, under Richard Nixon, uni­lat­er­al­ly ceased con­vert­ibil­i­ty of the dol­lar to gold. This meant that the dol­lar became an all out “fiat cur­ren­cy,” sus­tained by noth­ing but the promise of the fed­er­al gov­ern­ment. Known as the Nixon Shock, this action meant that the Unit­ed States dol­lar would be the sole back­ing of cur­ren­cies and a reserve cur­ren­cy for the world.

Our gov­ern­ment and gov­ern­ments around the world have been on a spend­ing binge. When the cen­tral bank is able to sup­press inter­est rates to zero and when the gov­ern­ment can finance its debts with for­eign cen­tral banks at neg­li­gi­ble inter­est rates—there’s no check on these debts

What about you? Are you on a spend­ing binge? Is your bal­ance sheet “AAA”? Are you in con­trol of your cash flow? Here’s a test: When you go out on Mon­day to cel­e­brate the anniver­sary, will you pay with cash?

Hap­py Anniver­sary!

 

August 15th: A Very Important Anniversary 2011-09-30T11:21:30+00:00
7 01, 2011

Take the ”LEAP” and Visit!

2017-09-01T13:21:19+00:00

The future has arrived! Our new web­site out­lines our holis­tic and com­pre­hen­sive approach to per­son­al finan­cial plan­ning. It includes an overview of the LEAP sys­tem fea­tur­ing the Wealth In Motion soft­ware, an out­line of our ser­vices and arti­cles that are at once enter­tain­ing and per­ti­nent to your finan­cial suc­cess.
(more…)

Take the ”LEAP” and Visit! 2017-09-01T13:21:19+00:00
5 01, 2011

Veteran’s Day

2011-01-05T16:14:44+00:00

World War I – known at the time as “The Great War” — offi­cial­ly end­ed when the Treaty of Ver­sailles was signed on June 28, 1919, in the Palace of Ver­sailles out­side the town of Ver­sailles, France. How­ev­er, fight­ing ceased sev­en months ear­li­er when an armistice, or tem­po­rary ces­sa­tion of hos­til­i­ties, between the Allied nations and Ger­many went into effect on the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month. For that rea­son, Novem­ber 11, 1918, is gen­er­al­ly regard­ed as the end of “the war to end all wars.”

(more…)

Veteran’s Day 2011-01-05T16:14:44+00:00
1 05, 2010

Memorial Day 2010

2010-09-03T12:09:34+00:00

It was 1866 and the Unit­ed States was recov­er­ing from the long and bloody Civ­il War between the North and the South. Sur­viv­ing sol­diers came home, some with miss­ing limbs, and all with sto­ries to tell. Hen­ry Welles, a drug­store own­er in Water­loo, New York, heard the sto­ries and had an idea. (more…)

Memorial Day 2010 2010-09-03T12:09:34+00:00